Production History


Persephone’s Return
The Women’s Mysteries
Lincoln in Queens
The Infinite as Art
Prologue: Prehistory
Electra
Agamemnon, King of Cars
Naked Kitchen
The Mill
Necessities of the Feast



Persephone’s Return

A short verse play, based on the version in Ovid, dedicated to Diane Middlebrook. A reading of the play was recorded in October 2011 by Ambrose Bye, with Ann Waldman, Phyllis Wat, Helene Christopoulos, Neal Climenhaga and Anthony Alves. Music and soundscape by Ambrose Bye. It was included in the album, New Festival of Rhizomes & Wraiths, of pieces developed in the workshop led by Ann Waldman and Ambrose Bye for the St. Marks Poetry Project.



The Women’s Mysteries

Full-length verse play set in ancient Greece at the dawn of history, based on a story in Plutarch.

The prologue and first scene of The Women’s Mysteries were performed in the St. Marks Poetry Project, Poets Theater Festival at LaMama Theater, NYC on May 18, 19 and 20, 1990, directed by Kevin O’Brien, with George Alvers, Roger Best, Anders Bolang, Steven Booker, James Loutzenhiser and Suzanne Turner. Festival coordinated by Bob Holman. The play was subsequently completed and later revised.



Lincoln in Queens

This poetic tale completes a trilogy with Agamemnon, King of Cars and Electra. It began as a poem, then developed as a poetry reading with slides. It was first work shopped in a rehearsal for the St. Marks Poetry Project, Poets Theater Festival in April 1988, but was too long for the festival. It was first presented as a poetry reading with slides at Solidaridad Humana on June 12, 1988, in a theater festival curated by Nina Zivancevic and Carlo Stephanos, then presented at Dixon Place on March 16, 1989 and at The Knitting Factory, all in downtown Manhattan.

A colleague at work, Leigh Block, had an opportunity to use public access facilities at Station QPTV, Queens, of Time Warner Cable, and used the opportunity to produce a video of Lincoln in Queens in January 1990. Another friend and colleague, Jane Polisar, very much encouraged Leigh to produce Lincoln in Queens. Gerry Hemingway provided music. Gerry first recorded me reading the poem in his home studio. Then he added his fine music. Leigh and I laid the audio track and added images in the television studio.

Lincoln In Queens won the Hometown USA Award from the National Federation of Local Cable Programmers in 1990, as the best art video produced on public access facilities in the US. It appeared on cable television in Manhattan and Queens, and was shown in the Videotech series at The Knitting Factory.



The Infinite as Art

A short verse play about politics, poetry and the infinite. Performed in the St. Marks Poetry Project, Poets Theater Festival at LaMama Theater, NYC, in May 1989, directed by Bill Considine, with Sparrow as the poet and Eve Packer as the Censor. Festival coordinated by Bob Holman.



Prologue: Prehistory

A short verse play, set in ancient Greece at the dawn of history. Performed in the St. Marks Poetry Project, Poets Theater Festival, in the theater of St. Mark’s Church, NYC, in May 1988. Directed by Bill Considine, with James Honzik, Sparrow, Mark Robbins and Philip Perkis. Set by Deborah Gans. Festival coordinated by Bob Holman.



Electra

Also known as The Furies:Electra. One-act verse play, first presented in a staged reading in Washington, D.C. in The Ritz Hotel exhibition of Collaborative Projects (Colab) and the Washington Project for the Arts (WPA) in early 1983, with Ilona Granet as Electra.

Subsequently staged in the Brooklyn Army Terminal, in the Pan Arts exhibition, on October 22 and 23, 1983, directed by Kevin O’Brien, with Sharon Take, Marjorie Ohle, Susan Riskin and David Stocker. Set by John Shaw, lighting by Michael Curtin.

A low-tech art video of the play in performance was created by Franz Vila, with music by Christian Marclay. It was shown on Manhattan cable television channel D and at the Red Bar, NYC, on January 2, 1984.



Agamemnon, King of Cars

One-act verse play, first presented in a rehearsed reading in the New York Shakespeare Festival’s Playwrights Unit at the Public Theater, in the Newman Theater, in November 1980, directed by John Nesci with Andrew Callahan as Agamemnon, Diane Salinger as Iphigenia, and Eric Loeb, Ebbe Roe Smith, Charles McKenna, Rosemary Moore, Nancy Shinkle, Carol Kane, Terry Ann Bennett, Julie Ariola, Carla Howard, Joanne McEntire, and Sherry Steiner.

Subsequently performed in a festival at Theater for a New City on June 5 and 6, 1982, directed by John Nesci, with Bill Sadler as Agamemnon, Mary Tepper as Iphigenia, and Matt Locricchio, Shelley Valfer, Len Jenkin, Dan Moran, Mike Moran, Charles McKenna, Rosemary Moore, Saun Ellis, Bridget Leicester, Joanne McEntire, Betty La Roe, and Julie Ariola. Music by Paul Galasso, set by John Arnone, costumes by Laura Drawbaugh, choreography by Pam Harling.



Naked Kitchen

One-act play, archetypal domestic, kitchen sink drama. First presented in a rehearsed reading in the New York Shakespeare Festival’s Playwrights Unit at the Public Theater, in the Anspacher Theater, in 1979, directed by Valeria Vasilevski, with John Nesci and Ann Ungar. Performed in March 1984 at Limbo Lounge and the Ear Inn, directed by Louisa Flaningam, with David Stocker and Sharon Take, set by John Shaw. Subsequently performed (under the name, Hot Kitchen) at ABC No Rio in January 1988, directed by Bill Considine with Kevin Martin and Bina Sharif, set by Deborah Gans.



The Mill

Full-length, character drama, set in an artist’s loft in NYC, presented in a rehearsed reading in the New York Shakespeare Festival’s Playwrights Unit at the Public Theater, in the Anspacher Theater, in 1978, with a cast including Diane Salinger and Ann Ungar.



Necessities of the Feast

Full-length political comedy, presented in a rehearsed reading in the New York Shakespeare Festival’s Playwrights Unit at the Public Theater, in Martinson Hall, on April 9, 1977 and at Theater at St. Clements on April 11, 12 and 13. Directed by Michael Nee, with Diane Barry, Clayton Berry, Sam Blackwell, Cortez Nance, Tom Sinclair, Ann Ungar, Ed Van Nuys, Shelley Wyant and John Wyeth. Playwrights Unit coordinated by Ed Bullins.